FAQs

What is a pediatric dentist?

Pediatric dentists are the pediatricians of dentistry. A pediatric dentist has two to three years specialty training following dental school and limits his/her practice to treating children only. Pediatric dentists are primary and specialty oral care providers for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health needs.

 

When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?

In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears, or no later than his/her first birthday. Remember “by first tooth or first birthday.”

 

Are baby teeth really that important to my child?

Primary, or “baby,” teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt.

 

How safe are dental X-rays?

There is very little risk in dental X-rays. Pediatric dentists are especially careful to limit the amount of radiation to which children are exposed. Lead aprons and high-speed film are used to ensure safety and minimize the amount of radiation. 

Without x-rays, certain cavities will be missed. They also help survey developing teeth, evaluate results of an injury or plan for orthodontic treatment. If dental problems are found and treated early, dental care is more comfortable for your child – and more affordable for you.

 

What should I do if my child has a toothache?

First, rinse the irritated area with warm salt water and place a cold compress on the face if it is swollen. Give the child acetaminophen for any pain, rather than placing aspirin on the teeth or gums. Finally, see a dentist as soon as possible.

 

What can I do to protect my child’s teeth during sporting events?

Soft plastic mouth guards can be used to protect a child’s teeth, lips, cheeks and gums from sport related injuries. Our doctors will recommend the best mouth guard for your child and custom fit one to protect your child from injuries from a fall or contact with other players or equipment.

 

What should I do if my child falls and knocks out a permanent tooth?

The most important thing to do is to remain calm. Then find the tooth. Hold it by the crown rather than the root and try to reinsert it in the socket. If that is not possible, put the tooth in a glass of milk. Contact our office immediately.

Consider keeping PDG’s free Knocked Out Tooth Kit on hand. They are available at no charge.

 

Are thumbsucking and pacifier habits harmful for a child’s teeth?

Thumb and pacifier sucking habits will generally only become a problem if they go on for a very long period of time. Most children stop these habits on their own, but if they are still sucking their thumbs or fingers past the age of three, a mouth appliance may be recommended by your pediatric dentist.

 

How do dental sealants work?

Sealants work by filling in the crevasses on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. This shuts out food particles that could get caught in the teeth, causing cavities. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for many years.

For more frequently asked questions, click here. http://www.aapd.org/resources/frequently_asked_questions/